| News

Computer virus hits US Air Force aircraft

In another confidence-inspiring episode from the originators of the acronym 'snafu' and the phrase 'broken arrow', US military news informs us that their Predator and Reaper drone fleet has been hit with a computer virus.

Nasty things, computer viruses, causing your PC to perform sluggishly, send details of your illicit pornography perusal to your email contacts list, or in this case, potentially rain down ultraviolent death upon the unsuspecting citizens living below. It's, clearly, worth shelling out for a decent viruschecker. Oops, perhaps 'shelling' is an unfortunate image to bring up.

Predator and Reaper drones are the charmingly-named remote-controlled aircraft the US Air Force uses in battlegrounds such as Afghanistan, with the virus – detected over two weeks ago – seeming to do little more than log the pilots' keystrokes as they engage in remotely-flown missions. The virus is proving difficult to remove:

"We keep wiping it off, and it keeps coming back," a source familiar with the network infection told Wired magazine. "We think it's benign. But we just don't know."
US Air Force bases worldwide have been advised to discontinue their use of the affected drones until further notice. Drones are a critical weapon of choice in US military operations. In Pakistan alone, around 30 drone strikes have been reported since elite US forces killed Al-Qaeda chief Osama bin Laden on May 2.
Read more at http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-10-virus-drone-fleet.html
Story credit (c) 2011 AFP
 

Comments are closed.

Our weekly newsletter

Sign up to get updates on articles, interviews and events.

Join Trebuchet on PatreonExclusive content and full media memberships available

This is the patreon page for Trebuchet podcast and website. We publish a beautiful printed magazine biannually and release an irregular podcast on contemporary art every month (or so). 

Our website is updated every other day with new art news, art criticism and much more. Become a backer and join us in discovering new forms of art that raise the heart rate and electrify the mind.  

Cookies and GDPR

By visiting this site you agree that you're fine with us using cookies. (read cookie policy)